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INTRODUCTION

The B.A Philosophy programme provides education in critical thinking skills to students. It exposes them to philosophical tools of understanding the world, and changing it. The course will help raise, in the students, awareness of the many challenges facing the world in the areas of ethics, science, religion, business, education, law, aesthetics, politics, and other valuable subjects. The aim is to, in the well-documented tradition of philosophy, train students as participants in the search for well-reasoned and critical approaches to these challenges.

 

STAFFING

The programme is led by an academic staff not below the rank of Senior Lecturer. Academic staff for the programme is located at the NOUN headquarters in Abuja. The main function of the academic staff is the development of self-learning instructional materials and as well as coordination of technology-mediated facilitation for students at the various study centres spread across the country.

  1. Name of the programme- B.A (Hons) Philosophy

Programme Code-2216

  1. Entry Requirements

To be admitted into BA Philosophy Degree Programme, the candidate is required to meet at least one of the following:

 

100 Level

  1. Five Ordinary Level (O/L) credit passes including English Language, Mathematics and any other three subjects at SSCE, GCE, NECO and NABTEB.

 

200 Level

  1. A minimum of 3 credits passes in IJMB, OND, NCE or its equivalent in addition to 5 credit passes at the ordinary level, including English Language and Mathematics.

 

  1. Diploma in Philosophy, Religious Studies, Islamic Studies, Christian Theology, Law, Political Science, Sociology, from NOUN and any other recognized institution, in addition to 5 credit passes at the Ordinary Level, including English Language.

 

  1. A minimum of second class lower degree from any other discipline from Universities recognized by the Senate of NOUN

 

  1. Any other qualification acceptable to Senate of NOUN.

 

  1. Philosophy

The B.A (Hons) Philosophy is designed to provide solid training in major areas of philosophy, Metaphysics, Epistemology, Logic, Ethics, African Philosophy, History of Philosophy, and Social and Political Philosophy.  It seeks to develop the intellectual abilities of students to enhance their critical, analytical, interpretive, comparative and problem-solving skills.

NOUN’s B.A (Hons) Philosophy programme will, through Open and Distance Learning, provide opportunity to those who seek knowledge in philosophy via intensive use of information and communication technology, to have functional and cost-effective education through the open and flexible mode of education that adds life-long values for all who are ready to be trained as such. On this note, it targets both fresh students and graduate of other disciplines who want to make philosophical knowledge the foundation of their professional engagements.

 

  1. Aims

The aims of the programme are to (1) equip the students with the critical, analytical and interpretive skills of philosophy needed for success in today’s world; (2) inculcate in the students a knowledge that is grounded in ethics and values that is also attuned to the needs of society.

 

  1. Objectives

  1. To provide for a broad, sound and solid foundation in philosophy.

  2. To provide education in, and expose students to the traditional branches of philosophy as a firm base for intending professional academic philosophers.

  • To equip the students with problem-solving skills capacities.

  1. To help train a workforce with requisite transferable work skills.

  2. To enhance the ability of the students to organise and criticise ideas and issues.

  3. To orient students towards developing the philosophical minds conducive to a pluralistic society such as Nigeria.

  • To seek to link academic/professional philosophy with social existence.

  1. Degree Rules

To receive the B.A degree in Philosophy, a student must have undergone 8 semesters of full-time study or 16 Semesters of flexible mode. In addition to this, the student must have earned a minimum of 120 Units of courses to qualify for graduation (including all the Departmental core courses). This is in addition to meeting the University Senate’s general regulations governing the award of undergraduate degrees in the University. Students admitted for Direct Entry, are however, exempted from the first year courses and are therefore expected to have undergone 6 semesters of full-time study or 12 semesters of flexible mode, and is expected to earn a minimum of 90 Units to qualify for graduation.

 

  1. Course Contents and Description

 

  1. Outline of Course Structure/ Required Maximum Credit Units per Semester

 

  1. Note: The required maximum credit unit per semester MUST NOT be exceeded in the registration of courses per semester by students.

 

 

 

 

100 Level

S/N

Course

Code

Course Title

Units

 

Status

First Semester

1.

GST 101

Use of English & Comm. Skills I

2

C

2.

GST 105

History and Philosophy of Science

2

C

3.

GST 107

The Good Study Guide

2

C

4.

PHL 101

Introduction to Philosophy

3

C

5.

PHL 105

Introduction to Logic 1

3

C

6.

PHL 107

Theories of Human nature

2

C

7.

CIT 101

Introduction to Computer Science

2

C

 

 

Elective Courses:  (Student to choose one from the under listed courses with status E)

 

 

8.

POL 111

Elements of Political Science

2

E

9.

PHL 103

Philosophy of Value

2

E

10.

CSS 111

Introduction to Sociology

2

E

 

 

Compulsory

Elective

16

2

 

·     Required Minimum Credit for the Semester

18

 

 

Second Semester

GST 102

Use of English & Comm. Skills II

2

C

PHL 102

Ancient Philosophies

3

C

PHL 106

Introduction to problems of philosophy

3

C

PHL 152

Introduction to Logic II

3

C

PHL126

Introduction to African Philosophy

3

C

CIT 102

Application Software Skills

2

C

 

 

Elective Courses:  (Student to choose one from the under listed courses with status E)

 

 

CRS 192

Introduction to African Traditional Religion

2

E

INR 132

Africa and the West

2

E

ISL 142

Islam and Inter-Religious Dialogue

2

E

 

 

Compulsory

Elective

16

2

 

·     Required Minimum Credit for the Semester

18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

200 Level

S/N

Course

Code

Course Title

Units

 

Status

First Semester

1.

GST 201

Nigerian Peoples and Culture

2

C

2.

GST 203

Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking

2

C

3.

PHL 201

Introduction to Metaphysics

3

C

4.

PHL 203

Introduction to Epistemology

3

C

5.

PHL 251

African Philosophy II

3

C

6.

PHL 253

Social and Political Philosophy

3

C

 

 

Elective Courses:  (Student to choose one from the under listed courses with status E)

 

 

6.

POL 211

Nigerian Legal System

2

E

7.

PHL 241

Comparative Philosophy

2

E

8.

PHL 205

Philosophical Anthropology

2

E

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compulsory

Elective

16

2

 

·     Required Minimum Credit for the Semester

18

Second Semester

GST 202

Fundamentals of Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution

2

C

PHL 214

Philosophy of Language

3

C

PHL 216

Medieval Philosophy

3

C

PHL 202

Marxist Philosophy

3

C

5.

PHL 204

Introduction to Ethics

3

C

 

 

Elective Courses:  (Student to choose two from the under listed courses with status E)

 

 

6.

PHL 242

Professional Ethics

2

E

7.

CRS 202

Comparative Study of Religions

2

E

8.

PHL 252

Philosophy of Religion

2

E

 

 

Compulsory

Electives

 

14

4

 

 

·     Required Minimum Credit for the Semester

18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 Level

S/N

Course

Code

Course Title

Units

 

Status

First Semester

PHL 303

Theories of Knowledge

3

C

 PHL 333

Philosophy of Education

3

C

PHL 335

Analytic Philosophy

3

C

PHL 321

Contemporary Issues in Ethics

3

C

PHL 301

Symbolic Logic

3

C

PHL 305

Advance Political Philosophy

2

C

 

 

Elective Courses:  (Student to choose one from the under listed courses with status E)

 

 

PHL 313

Philosophy of Labour and Leisure

2

E

PHL 323

Philosophy of Arts and Literature

2

E

PHL 361

Philosophy of Social Sciences

2

E

 

 

Compulsory

Electives

17

2

 

 

·     Required Minimum Credit for the Semester

19

 

Second Semester

PHL 312

Existentialism, Hermeneutics and Phenomenology

3

C

PHL 314

Advance Metaphysics

3

C

PHL 324

Cybernetics/Artificial Intelligence

2

C

PHL 342

Early Modern Philosophy

3

C

PHL 372

Research Method in Philosophy

3

C

 

 

Elective Courses:  (Student to choose one from the under listed courses with status E)

 

 

6.

PHL 362

Philosophy of Development

2

E

7.

PHL 316

Philosophy of Gender

2

E

8.\

PHL 322

Philosophy of Nationalism

2

E

9.

ISL 374

Islamic Political Institutions

2

E

 

 

 

Compulsory

Electives

 

14

2

 

 

·     Required Minimum Credit for the Semester

16

 

 

 

 

400 Level

S/N

Course

Code

Course Title

Units

 

Status

First Semester

1.

PHL 411

Philosophy of Mind

3

C

2.

PHL 413

Metaphysical Anthropology

3

C

3.

PHL 431

Further Logic

3

C

4.

PHIL 433

Philosophy of Science

2

C

5.

PHL 435

African Political Theorists

3

C

 

 

Elective Courses:  (Student to choose one from the under listed courses with status E)

 

 

6.

PHL 415

Philosophy of History

2

E

6

CRS 423

Comparative Ethics in Pluralistic Society

2

E

 

 

Compulsory

Electives

14

2

 

 

·     Required Minimum Credit for the Semester

16

Second Semester

1.

PHL 422

Intercultural Philosophy

2

C

2.

PHL 442

Late Modern Philosophy

3

C

2.

PHL 462

Philosophy of Law

3

C

3.

PHL 472

Seminar

3

C

4.

PHL 482

Project

6

C

 

 

Elective Courses:  (Student to choose one from the under listed courses with status E)

 

 

5.

PHL 454

Advance Philosophy of Religion

2

E

6.

PHL 432

Applied Ethics

2

E

 

 

Compulsory

Elective

 

17

2

 

 

·     Required Minimum Credit for the Semester

19

 

 

SUMMARY OF DISTRIBUTION OF COURSE BY LEVEL

LEVEL

COMPULSORY

ELECTIVE

TOTAL

100

32

4

36

200

30

6

36

300

31

4

35

400

31

4

35

TOTAL

124

18

142

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUMMARY:

  • Total Units Listed = 142

  • Required minimum for Graduation:

From 100 Level = 120

Direct Entry       = 90

 

 

YEAR ONE

 

FIRST SEMESTER

 

GST 101: USE OF ENGLISH AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS I (2 Credit Units)  C

Listening; Enabling skills and note taking, comprehension and information retrieval: General, comprehensive and information retrieval: Data, figures, diagrams, and charts, listening for main ideas, for interpretation and critical evaluation effective reading, skimming, and scanning, reading and comprehending at varying speed level reading and comprehension at various speed levels. Vocabulary development in various academic contexts; reading diverse texts in narratives and expository. Reading and comprehension passages with tables, scientific texts. Reading for interpretation and critical evaluation.

 

GST 105: HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE         (2 Credit Units) C

General description of the nature and basic scientific methods and theories; History of western science and science in ancient times, middle ages and the rise of modern science; An overview of African Science, man and his environment and natural resources; Nature, scope and technological development and innovations; Great scientists of Nigerian origin.

 

GST 107: THE GOOD STUDY GUIDE (0 Credit Units) C

Getting started: How to use the book, why read about skills, getting yourself organized, what is studying all about, reading and note taking: Introduction, reactions to reading, your reading strategy, memory, taking notes, conclusion. Other ways of studying: Introduction, learning in groups, note taking and lectures, learning from T.V. and Radio broadcast, other study media. Working with numbers: Getting to know numbers, describing the world, describing the tables, describing with diagrams and graphs, what is good writing? The importance of writing, what does an essay look like? What is a good essay? How to write essays: Introduction, the craft of writing, the advantages of treating essay writing as a craft, making your essay flow, making a convincing case, the experience of writing and preparing for examination.

 

CIT 101: COMPUTER IN SOCIETY (2 Credit Units) C                                       

What is Computer? Types of Computer; History of Digital Computer; Element of Computer: Hardware and software; How to work with a Computer; Operating System Windows Files Word Processing, Copying a Text, saving, Changes to a Document and Formatting, Spelling Checker and Introduction to Printing a Document; Spread sheet, Entering and Correcting Data; Using Formula; Numeric Formats Creating Charts; Types of Charts; Power Points and presentation.

 

PHL 101:        INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY      (3 Credit Units) C

This course is divided into three parts, namely, (1) Conceptual clarifications of the meaning of philosophy. This will also include a general introduction to the notions, language, style, and method of Philosophy. The etymological definition of philosophy, philosophy as worldview, as science, as discipline. The characteristics and value of philosophy. Philosophy and related fields – Science, Arts and Religion. A brief survey of the main branches of Philosophy – Epistemology, Metaphysics, Ethics, Logic, Philosophy of Religion, Social and Political Philosophy. Philosophy (2) Discussion of African philosophical tradition (3) Discussion of other philosophical traditions. (3 units).

PHL 103: PHILOSOPHY OF VALUE (2 Credit Units) E

The course undertakes a study of value; its meaning and scope. The problem of the varieties of value; kinds of value: aesthetic values, religious values, economic values, moral values. The distinction between value judgments and factual judgments. An examination of moral concepts, such as good, bad, right, wrong. The notions of justice, natural rights and the grounds of moral obligation. The relevance of moral theory to issues in practical life.

 

PHL 105:        INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC I     (3 Credit Units) C

This course begins with definitions of logic. It then discusses the basic elements of logic. The nature of logic, the laws of thought, concept, terms, propositions and judgments; the principles of definition, the processes of inference, inductive and deductive arguments as well as the nature and types of syllogism. Standard form categorical propositions, their diagrammatical representations, using Venn & other diagrams to test the validity of syllogisms, traditional square of opposition, types of inference, including conversion, obversion and contraposition, etc.

PHL 107:        THEORIES OF HUMAN NATURE (2 Credit Units) C

This course studies the nature of human being. It is a broad survey to the question: ‘what is human being? Are human beings free? Are they from animals and how? Theories of human nature as offered by Plato, Thomas Hobbes, Niccolo Machiavelli, Marxism, Sigmund Freud (psychoanalysis), existentialism, behaviourism and Christianity will be examined.

CSS 111: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (3 Credit Units) E            

Definition of Sociology, family, marriage, society, and culture, socialization; Conforming, deviance, power authority, leadership, social organizations, group, social differentiation, religion, social interactions, social stratification, social mobility, collective behavior, public opinion and propaganda, social change.

 

POL 111: ELEMENTS OF POLITICAL SCIENCE                               (3-Credit Units) E

Definition, nature and scope of politics; Politics as Art and Science; History and evolution of Political Science: British and American; Power, influence and authority; Theories, origins and characteristics of the State; Forms of Government: Democracy, Monarchy, Theocracy etc; Meaning and nature of Political Parties and ideologies; Meaning and nature of Interest Groups and Pressure Groups and methods of operations; Constitution and Constitutionalism; Revolution and Change in society.

 

SECOND SEMESTER

 

GST 102: USE OF ENGLISH AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS II (2 Credit Units) C

Listening: Enabling Skills and note taking, comprehension and information retrieval: General comprehensive and information retrieval: Data, figures, Diagrams and charts, listening for main ideas, for interpretation and critical evaluation Effective reading, skimming, and scanning, Reading and comprehending at varying speed level Reading and comprehension at various speed levels, Vocabulary development in various academic contexts; reading diverse texts in narratives and expository, reading and comprehension passages with tables, scientific texts, Reading for interpretation and critical evaluation.

 

CRS 151:        RELIGION AND SOCIETY           (2 Units) E

Religion and society; the impact of religion on society; the impact of society on religion; religion and family life; religion and social life; religion and economic life and religion and political life among others.

 

CIT 102: APPLICATION SOFTWARE SKILLS (2 CREDIT UNITS) C

Brief of computer system: CPU, I/O devices; Operating system; computer file management; computer software: overview, types etc.; Application software: common application software; using Microsoft word; using Microsoft excel; features of database applications and Microsoft access; statistical analysis applications; using SPSS software; introduction to desktop publishing applications; computer applications in nursing; computer applications in agriculture; managing the computer system with the control panel.

 

PHL 102:    ANCIENT PHILOSOPHIES (3 Credit Units) C

This course studies early philosophical thoughts: African: Egypt (three schools/centres of philosophy), Ethiopia. Eastern (China, India, Persia), Western Philosophy; the Ionian and Eleatic Schools; the Sophists; Socrates, Plato and the Academy; Aristotle and the Peripatetic School; the Stoics and Epicureans. Greco-Jewish Philosophy; Plotinus and Neo-Platonism.

PHL 106: INTRODUCTION TO THE PROBLEMS OF PHILOSOPHY

This course studies the various fundamental problems of philosophy. The course is to provoke positive and constructive discussion on issues such as One and the Many, Appearance and Reality, Cause and Effect, Existence of Matter, Universal and Particular, Truth and Falsehood, etc.

 

PHL 152:        INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC II (3 Credit Units) C

The course studies the nature of truth and validity; induction and analogy; the nature of fallacies and psychological pitfalls in thinking; modern scientific method of inquiry with reference to Mill’s method, etc.

 

 

PHL 126:        INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN PHILOSOPHY (3 Credit Units) C

This course studies philosophy and African philosophy. The problem of definition and the debate about the nature and existence of African philosophy. The currents of African philosophy: Ethno-philosophy, sage philosophy, nationalist ideological current, the critical current, historical current. History and historiography of African Philosophy, Division/branches of African philosophy.

 

 

CRS 192         INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN TRADITIONAL RELIGION (2 Units)

Terminology, structure and stages of the study of African Traditional Religion; the beliefs; philosophies of women in relation to deity; man and the spirit world; the divinities; ancestors; witchcraft; magic and medicine men and their roles in African Traditional Religion.

 

INR 132: AFRICA AND THE WEST (2 Credit Units) E

Historical Perspective of Relationship existing between Africa and the West, The changing patterns of the relations between African States and the countries of Europe and America since the colonial period, The influence of the West on the relations of African states and the place of Africa in the rivalry between the East and the West, the emerging new world order.

 

POL 126: CITIZENS AND STATE (3 Credit Units) E

Relationship between citizens and the state; Duties and obligations of the state; Nature of strained relations and process of rectification; Political obligation, basis of freedom, loyalty and patriotism.

 

 

YEAR TWO

 

FIRST SEMESTER

PHL 201:        INTRODUCTION TO METAPHYSICS (3 Credit Units) C

The course studies the nature, origin, object and value of metaphysics. Branches of metaphysics.   Metaphysics and other branches of philosophy. Treatment of some traditional metaphysical problems, e.g. the problem of being, mind-body problem, appearance and reality, universals and particulars. The difference between metaphysical and scientific explanations, etc.

 

PHL 203:        INTRODUCTION TO EPISTEMOLOGY           (3 Credit Units) C

This course introduces epistemology, studies the philosophical problems concerning the nature, foundations, and scope of knowledge. An introduction to the types, sources, approaches, validity and justification of human knowledge. Relating knowledge to opinion, belief, and truth.  A study of skepticism. (3 Units).

 

PHL 251:        AFRICAN PHILOSOPHY (3 Credit Units) C

This course undertakes descriptive and analytic examination of African traditional thought, its world-views and main characteristics (religious, moral, mythological etc). The African ontological notions of force, being and spirits. Cosmological notions, the concepts of life, death, mystical power, destiny, nature, etc. Rites and institutional structures embodying African traditional thoughts. Relating African tradition and thought to the African environment.

PHL 253:        SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3 Credit Units) C

This course introduces Social and Political Philosophy, its methods and relevance.  It undertakes a study of the major themes and figures in the history of social and political thought such as: Justice (Plato, Aristotle, Rawls, Iris Young), Power and Authority (Machiavelli and Hobbes), State of Nature and Social Contract (Hobbes and Locke), General Will (Rousseau) Majority Rule (Locke), Liberty (Mill), Revolution and Alienation (Marx), Democracy, etc.  Attempts should be made to relate these themes to contemporary concerns in African Thought and situation, etc.

PHL 241:        COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY (2 Credit Units) E

This course is a comparative study of Asian, African and Western systems of thought in relation to such themes as the origin of life, the status of man, the nature of morality, God and the meaning of life, destiny, death and post-mortem states. The problem of cross-cultural understanding.

PHL 205PHILOSOPHICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (2 Credit Units) E

This course introduces the student to the basic concepts and issues of philosophical anthropology. It devotes attention to a study of the history of the philosophy of the person. This traces the development of the concept of the person from the three philosophical traditions; African, Eastern and Western. It also discusses the crises of the human person. The various theories of the human person are also examined. The causes, aspects and manifestations of the crises are given attention.

 

POL 211: NIGERIAN LEGAL SYSTEM (3-Credit Units)   E

Meaning/Evolution of Law; Law and Morality; Types/Theories/classification of Law; Sources/Nature of Nigerian Legal System; Nigerian Legislation; Legislative Process; The Rules of Law and Political Governance; Tools of Social Control via Law; Hierarchy of Courts in Nigeria; The judiciary and Democracy in Nigeria; Crime Control in Nigeria; Outline of Civil Procedure in Nigeria; Enforcement of Judgments; Outline of Criminal Procedure in Nigeria; Legal Aid Council in Nigeria.

 

 

SECOND SEMESTER

 

GST 202: FUNDAMENTALS OF PEACE STUDIES AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION

(2 Credit Units) C

A brief survey of the basic concepts in peace studies and conflict resolution, peace as vehicle of unity and development, conflict issues, types of conflict, for example, ethnic, religious and economic conflicts, root causes of conflicts and violence in Africa, indigene and settler phenomena, peace-building, management of conflict and security; elements of peace studies and conflict resolution, developing a culture of peace, peace mediation and peace-keeping, alternative dispute resolution (ADR). Dialogue and arbitration in conflict resolution, role of international organizations in conflict resolution, e.g. ECOWAS, African Union, United Nations, etc.

 

 

PHL 202:        MARXIST PHILOSOPHY (3 Credit Units) C

 

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of Marxism: Materialism, Dialectics, Marxist view on human nature, Society and Morals, History and Social change. It is meant to investigate Marxist answer to questions posed in traditional philosophy and issues of contemporary human life.

 

PHL 204:        INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS (3 Credit Units) C

 

This discusses the origin, assumptions, definition, division and methodology of ethics.  The value of ethics; is ethics a science or art? It also studies the nature of human conduct; human acts; the relationship between ethics and morality; ethics and law; the concept of moral law. Some of the Fundamental Principles of Ethics; Definition of good. The nature of right and wrong; Principles of justice and conscience. Knowing the good and doing the good. (3 units)

 

PHL 252:        PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION (2 Credit Units) E

This course studies the existence and nature and activity of God and other spirits from the point of view of metaphysics and cultural experience. Creation, analogy and participation. The questions of evil and determinism. The experience of the sacred and communication with the divine. The origin and nature of religion. Religious language, myth, symbol and ritual. The question of placating and controlling or submitting to spiritual powers. Further exploration of philosophical theology, the problem of evil, religious reasoning and language; mysticism; symbolism and reductionism; immortality; the relationship between religion and society; a critical study of important texts. The problems of evil. Religion and the basis of morality. Mysticism and religion. Nature of religious language.

 

PHL 214:        PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE (2 Credit Units) C

Contemporary issues in the philosophy of language, including private language, theories of meaning, dimensions of meaning and reference, naming and necessity theories of description and indexical reference, the language of thought. Emphasis will be placed on isolating and clarifying the problems and attempting solutions to them.

 

PHL 242:   PROFESSIONAL ETHICS (2 Credit Units) E

This course studies the method of application of the principles and methods studied in PHL 103 & PHL 108 to the various professions which present moral/ethical problems to their practitioners. It includes medical ethics, media ethics, business ethics, work ethics, the ethics of state/war/rebellion, engineering ethics etc.

 

PHL 216:        MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY (3 Credit Units) C

This course undertakes a detailed study of the philosophical thought of the Middle Ages with special attention to the key figures of the era. The Christian synthesis: St Augustine, St Anselm, St Aquinas etc. The Arabic synthesis:  Avicenna, Averroes, Maimonides, etc. The Ontological argument, Philosophy versus Theology, Jewish Philosophy, Solomon Ibn Gabirol and Moses Maimonides. Jewish movement of translation, Shemtob Ben, Joseph Ibn Falgera, philosophy and Cabala etc.

 

CRS 202         COMPARATIVE STUDY OF RELIGION (2 Units) E  

The comparative study of the nature, beliefs, sacred writings and practices of some major religions of the world: Christianity; Islam; Buddhism; Shintoism; the distinctiveness and importance of each of these religions.

 

YEAR THREE

FIRST SEMESTER

 

PHL 301:        SYMBOLIC LOGIC (3 Credit Units) C

This course introduces the students to the development, importance and uses of symbolism in Logic: This is designed to enable students develop skills in symbolic reasoning; the tools and techniques of formal logic, dealing mainly with propositional and first order quantificational logic.

 

PHL 305:        ADVANCE POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (2 Credit Units)

This course will focus on central topics in political philosophy such as social justice, human rights, liberty and liberalism, politics and power, political obligation and disobedience. The course will also investigate how we evaluate different political systems and assess their relative merits and virtues. It will evaluate the justification, values and operation of democratic forms of government. Given the purpose of democracy, how is it attained and preserved? What are the controversies in democratic theory and practice in Africa?

 

 

PHL 331:        THEORIES OF KNOWLEDGE (3 Credit Units) C

The course exposes the student to a detailed treatment of typical epistemological problems e.g. truth and meaning; knowledge of other minds, justification and verifiability of knowledge claims; foundationalism and fallibilism; the continental rationalists, (Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza), British empiricists (Locke, Hume and Berkeley); epistemological problems of particular disciplines e.g. science or history.

 

PHL 333:        PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION (3 Credit Units) C

This introduces the student to philosophy of education, the relationship between philosophy and education; an examination of the basic concepts, principles, nature, goal and forms of education; the implications of the various schools of philosophy  for education; philosophic study of leading theories of education; the problems of education in Nigeria today and their implications for nationhood and national development.

 

PHL 335:        ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY (2 Credit Units) C

This course is an examination of the emergence, nature and methods of contemporary analytic philosophy with emphasis on logical atomism; positivism, ordinary language philosophy. Attention will be focused on scholars like Carnap, Wittgenstein, Frege, Russell, Quine, Ryle, etc.

 

PHL 321:        CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN ETHICS (3 Credit Units) C

The course examines current moral debates of particular relevance and interest to Africa and Nigeria, e.g. technology transfer, bio-technology, capital punishment, abortion, euthanasia, same-sex marriage, justification for terrorism, etc. will be selected. Such topics will be studied in critical light of standard ethical theories, and with creative vision of human existence.

 

 

 

PHL 313:        PHILOSOPHY OF LABOUR AND LEISURE (2 Credit Units) E

The course is divided into two. The first section examines labour in pre-civil societies and political communities, past and present. The relationship between the arts and human labour; effects of human work on nature. Examination of related concepts such as anthropotechnics, technocracy. Human labour and economics with reference to the various theories of capitalism, marxism and other economic philosophies. The relationship between conceptions of law and ethics and labour. The second section examines the concept of leisure. The relationship between leisure and labour, the essence of leisure, etc.

 

PHL 323:        PHILOSOPHY OF ARTS AND LITERATURE (2Credit Units) E

This course is a general introduction to aesthetics; theories of art, such as formalism, expressionism, functionalism, contextualism etc. Philosophical problems that arise in art and literature; art, literature, and the human good; criticism in art and literature, the concept of beauty, problems which arise in interpreting and evaluating works of art, significance of changes in fashion, standards of taste, and norms of literary truth in literature, aesthetic judgment, metaphysical status of works of art, concept of imagination.

PHL 361:        PHILOSOPHY OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (2 Credit Units) E

This course undertakes a philosophical inquiry into the methodology of the Social Sciences; the problems encountered in the disciplines concerned with man and society. Topics to be discussed will include the meaning of causation, the problem of induction; the use and abuse of statistics, the place of ideological models in social studies; the ethical implications of social engineering, Objectivity, law and theories; hypothesis and explanation. Causation and human action, philosophical study of major theories of society, e.g. Functionalism, structuralism, etc.

 

SECOND SEMESTER

PHL312:         EXISTENTIALISM, HERMENEUTICS AND PHENOMENOLOGY (3 Credit Units) C

This course is an introductory study of major themes and scholars in existentialism and phenomenology. Major authors to be studied include Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, Heidegger and Buber. The themes will include the meaning of life, the individual (self) versus society: the existence or non-existence of God, freedom and choice, etc.

 

PHL 314:        ADVANCE METAPHYSICS (3 Credit Units) C

This course studies systems of metaphysics; realism, idealism, nominalism, universalism, etc; Concepts of nature, reality and thought; Problems of Being and human nature; substance, freedom, determinism, fatalism, participation, essence and existence, chance etc. The relevance of metaphysics to contemporary problems.  Major modern and contemporary philosophers. It also studies theories of time; the relationship between time, space and consciousness.  The perception of time in various cosmologies (African, Western and Eastern); Time, permanence and change; Time, temporality and eternity, etc.

 

PHL 342:        EARLY MODERN PHILOSOPHY (3 Credit Units) C

The course exposes the student to the beginning of modern philosophy; the rise of science; Descartes, Berkeley, Locke, Hume, Leibniz, Spinoza. Emphasis will be placed on the empiricist/rationalist controversy.

 

PHL 372:        RESEARCH METHOD IN PHILOSOPHY (3 Credit Units) C

This is an in-depth study of the purpose and methods of philosophical research. The course should acquaint students with the most current edition of MLA research and reference method.  Emphasis should be laid on selection of topics for research, how to locate, analyse, assess and collect information from libraries and other sources and how to document research in the humanities.

 

PHL 322:        PHILOSOPHY OF NATIONALISM (2 Credit Units) E

The course studies the concept of nationhood; relationships between nation, state, country, government etc, nationalism and ethnicity; individualism, communalism and nationalism; patriotism, political virtues, philosophy and conflict resolution.

 

PHL 324:        CYBERNETICS/ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (2 Credit Units) C

The course introduces students to the study of Artificial Intelligence (A.I.), a peculiar type of intelligence that emanates from machines. It is a broad survey of the ability of intelligent machines in storing information, resolving mathematical problems and its accuracy in acquisition of knowledge. Students shall be exposed to, the nature of A.I., that is, its capacity of knowledge representation in the area of simulation, dissemination of information, information retrieval and machine language, and the contribution of A.I. to the growth of human knowledge and various ways through which A.I. can promote better understanding of the sources, scopes and limits of human knowledge. Furthermore, the course shall examine the epistemological limitations of A.I. In other words, the kind of knowledge offered by Intelligent machines as well as the controversial debates on whether machines can be equated with men or not, and the irreducibility of human consciousness shall be subject of philosophical study.

 

 

PHL 316:        PHILOSOPHY OF GENDER (2 Credit Units) E

This course studies gender issues in human relations; Gender relations in such social contexts as the family, organizations, education, politics; Study of feminist philosophies.

PHL 362:        PHILOSOPHY OF DEVELOPMENT (2 Credit Units) E

This course examines key concepts current in the analysis of cultures, politics and economics of third world nations such as social progress, evolution, modernization, etc. Examination of the nature of development, conceptions and theories of development; their philosophical basis and related issues.

 

 

 

YEAR FOUR

 

FIRST SEMESTER

 

PHL 411:        PHILOSOPHY OF MIND (3 Credit Units) C

This course is an inquiry into the problems of mind and consciousness. Materialist theories of mind; dualist theories; analysis of the mind or soul; functions attributed to the mind, classical problems of philosophical psychology e.g. personal identity, disembodied existence, etc are also studied.

 

PHL 413 METAPHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY           (2 Credit Units) E

This course examines such topics as body and soul, self-transcendence, immortality and after life; personal identity. The course also explores the concept of the person in individualist metaphysics, and the concept of the person in communalist metaphysics.

 

PHL 415 PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY (2 Credit Units) C

This course deals with philosophical problems concerning the historian’s attempt to understand and explain human history. It will examine various questions such as: Is history is a science? Is objectivity possible in history? What is the nature of historical explanations? Other issues such as causation in history, methodological individualism and holism in history shall also be part of the contents that will be examined.

 

PHL 431:        FURTHER LOGIC (3 Credit Units) C

The course examines the contribution of scholars like Frege, Russell, Godel, Whitehead, Quine, etc. will be examined. Treatment of predicate calculus; proofs and disproof in predicate calculus, identity and non-identity inference patterns; probability calculus, axiomatic method and set theory; rules of inference, the tree test, problems, adequacy of the tree test and deduction trees; logic of descriptions, classes and relations.

 

 

PHL 433:        PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE        (2 Credit Units) E

This cause explores the basic issues in the philosophy of science; the nature and methods of science; the progress of science, metaphysical foundations of science; the nature of scientific truth; science and reality, the testability and confirmation of scientific truths. The students will also be exposed to a number of classics in Philosophy of Science, (Bacon, Popper, Carnap, Kuhn, Fayerband, Polanyi, etc.).

 

PHL 435: AFRICAN POLITICAL THEORISTS (3 Credit Units) C

The course undertakes a study of a number of African political theorists. The writings of Nkrumah, Nyerere, Azikiwe, Awolowo, Fanon, Senghor, etc., will be studied.

 

CRS 423         COMPARATIVE ETHICS IN PLURALISTIC SOCIETIES (2 Units) E

The comparative study of Christian Ethics, Islamic ethics and ethics of African Traditional Religion. The ethical implications of these religions to corporate existence in a pluralistic society.

 

SECOND SEMESTER

PHL 422:        INTERCULTURAL PHILOSOPHY (2 Units) C

This course will introduce students to the current discourses on the questions of culture, philosophy and their relationship, perspectives and perceptions in and across various climes in the world. Students will be exposed to meanings of culture and philosophy with the intention to address the questions; Is there philosophy or are there philosophies? The idea of intercultural philosophy, is it another philosophy or a platform for philosophies? The course will also examine the ideas between cross-cultural and intercultural philosophy, African philosophy in the intercultural platform, Western and Asian philosophies, parameters of Cross-cultural philosophy and perspectives on intercultural philosophy etc.  

 

PHL 442:        LATE MODERN PHILOSOPHY (3 Credit Units) C

This course is a study of selected works of Kant, Hegel, Karl Marx, etc. with particular attention to their development and influence on African and other countries. A study of post-Kantian influences on the philosophies of Merleau–Ponty, Heidegger, Husserl and Sartre.

 

PHL 462:        PHILOSOPHY OF LAW (3 Credit Units) C

The course exposes the student to the basic issues in the Philosophy of Law; the concept of justice, the nature of law, the logic of rational reasoning, legal responsibility and morality, legal rights and obligations of persons. A detailed examination of theories of law; legal realism, positivism, marxist theory of law, etc.

 

PHL 472:        SEMINAR     (3 Credit Units) C

As directed by the lecturer, students will write long essay on problems in any area of philosophy. The long essays will be presented and discussed in seminar meetings.

 

PHL 482:        PROJECT                 (6 Credit Units) C

Under the supervision of lecturers assigned by the department, each student shall undertake a research project on a subject of interest in any area in philosophy.  The result of the research shall be embodied in a long essay which shall be defended in an oral examination.

 

 

PHL 454:        ADVANCE PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION        (2 Units) E

 

This course is a follow up of PHL 252. It will treat critically and comprehensivelyselected topics in Philosophy of Religion such as miracle, magic, problems of religious language, religious crisis in Nigeria, various theories about the nature of religion, religion and politics, etc.

 

 

 

LIST OF STAFF

  1. EMERITUS PROFESSOR GODWIN SOGOLO    EMERITUS PROFESSOR

B.A Hons.Philosophy (Ife, 1972); PhD (Philosophy, Wales, 1976) FSPSP

 

 

  1. PROFESSOR UDUMA O. UDUMA

B.A Hons. Philosophy (Calabar, 1988); PhD (Philosophy, Unilag, 1995); LLB (Nigeria, 2004); MNIM; FIIA

 

  1. DR OYEKUNLE O. ADEGBOYEGA                   SENIOR LECTURER

B.A Hons. Philosophy (Ogun, 1994); M.A (Philosophy, Ibadan, 1997); PhD (Political Philosophy, Ibadan, 2009)

 

  1. DR ERIC OMAZU               SENIOR LECTURER I

  2. A Hons, Philosophy (2002), MA (Philosophy, 2006), PhD (Metaphysics 2012).

 

  1. DR ELOCHUKWU VALENTINE AFOKA

 

Admission Requirements

To be admitted into BA Philosophy degree programme, the candidate is required to meet at least one of the following requirements:

100 Level

  • Five Ordinary Level (O/L) credit passes including English Language, Mathematics and any other three subjects at SSCE, GCE, NECO and NABTEB.

200 Level

  • A minimum of 3 credits passes in IJMB, OND, NCE or its equivalent in addition to 5 credit passes at the ordinary level, including English Language and Mathematics.
  • Diploma in Philosophy, Religious Studies, Islamic Studies, Christian Theology, Law, Political Science, Sociology, from NOUN and any other recognized institution, in addition to 5 credit passes at the Ordinary Level, including English Language.
  • A minimum of second-class lower degree from any other discipline from Universities recognized by the Senate of NOUN
  • Any other qualification acceptable to Senate of NOUN.

Graduation Requirements

To receive the BA degree in Philosophy, a student must have undergone 8 semesters of full-time study or 16 Semesters of flexible mode. In addition to this, the student must have earned a minimum of 120 Units of courses to qualify for graduation (including all the Departmental core courses). This is in addition to meeting the University Senate’s general regulations governing the award of undergraduate degrees in the University. Students admitted for Direct Entry, are however, exempted from the first year courses and are therefore expected to have undergone 6 semesters of full-time study or 12 semesters of flexible mode, and is expected to earn a minimum of 90 Units to qualify for graduation.

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